Deze website maakt gebruik van bestanden (zoals cookies) en andere technologie. Door verder te surfen, stem je in met het gebruik hiervan.

Dominique Provost
©DIVA, Museum voor Juwelen, Edelsmeedkunst en Diamant  

Previous Image 1 of 11 Next

Dominique Provost
©DIVA, Museum voor Juwelen, Edelsmeedkunst en Diamant  

Previous Image 2 of 11 Next

Dominique Provost
©DIVA, Museum voor Juwelen, Edelsmeedkunst en Diamant  

Previous Image 3 of 11 Next

Dominique Provost
©DIVA, Museum voor Juwelen, Edelsmeedkunst en Diamant  

Previous Image 4 of 11 Next

Dominique Provost
©DIVA, Museum voor Juwelen, Edelsmeedkunst en Diamant  

Previous Image 5 of 11 Next

Dominique Provost
©DIVA, Museum voor Juwelen, Edelsmeedkunst en Diamant  

Previous Image 6 of 11 Next

Dominique Provost
©DIVA, Museum voor Juwelen, Edelsmeedkunst en Diamant  

Previous Image 7 of 11 Next

Dominique Provost
©DIVA, Museum voor Juwelen, Edelsmeedkunst en Diamant  

Previous Image 8 of 11 Next

White Light
©DIVA, Museum voor Edelsmeedkunst, Juwelen en Diamant Antwerpen  

Previous Image 9 of 11 Next

White Light
©DIVA, Museum voor Edelsmeedkunst, Juwelen en Diamant Antwerpen  

Previous Image 10 of 11 Next

White Light
©DIVA, Museum voor Edelsmeedkunst, Juwelen en Diamant Antwerpen  

Previous Image 11 of 11 Next

This piece of jewellery is a technical tour de force. Like a real peacock, the wearer cannot fail to steal the show! The feathers are set ‘en tremblant’ by the use of a flat spring and a counterweight. This technique makes the feathers tremble, as if the peacock was opening its tail. In the eighteenth century the peacock was the ultimate symbol of sublime beauty. In the course of the nineteenth century it became the personification of the femme fatale. Carefully chosen precious stones from various countries represent the peacock’s magnificent display of colour. The rubies are from Burma and of an exceptionally high quality. The sapphires come from Ceylon (Sri Lanka) and the emeralds from India. Today three peacock brooches set with diamonds, sapphires, rubies and emeralds, the bird perched on a pearl, are attributed to Gustave Baugrand (1826-1870). They date from around 1867. Only one of the brooches bears Baugrand’s signature. At some point in history, the other two lost their original fastening and back so that there is no signature and no stamp.